Low carb seafood dim sum from the Asian Paleo Cookbook is super simple yet so incredibly delicious, you will be blown away! With only 3 ingredients in the seasoning, it takes only 5 minutes to assemble, making this Chinese fish and seafood recipe the ultimate low carb weeknight meal!

Low carb seafood dim sum from the Asian Paleo Cookbook by ChihYu Smith I Heart Umami

Low Carb Seafood Dim Sum from Asian Paleo Cookbook

Friends! My first cookbook Asian Paleo is finally here! To celebrate the book launch, I want to share a famous Chinese seafood recipe from the cookbook with you. I love that this low carb dim sum is incredibly delicious and super versatile. You can use any type of white (meaty) fish fillets or substitute other seafood that you prefer. You can also adjust the quantity of each ingredient based on your personal preference. Make this Chinese steamed seafood recipe using a bamboo steamer basket OR a shallow heat-proof bowl!

Low carb seafood dim sum from the Asian Paleo Cookbook by ChihYu Smith I Heart Umami

Is dim sum low carb?

Dim Sum is originated from Canton province, China and with various variety from dumplings to shumai, and to steamed buns. Dim sum is usually steamed or deep fried and the fillings can be savory or sweet. Steamed savory dim sums are usually low carb however the dumpling wrappers aren’t low carb. If the seasonings inside of the dumplings have added sugar or starch, this will increase the dumpling carb count, too.

The three most common dim sum dipping sauces are soy-chili, white vinegar-ginger, and mustard. The white vinegar-ginger dipping sauce is low carb. The other two depends on how the chili paste and mustard are made. Most likely they aren’t low carb.

To make my dim sum low carb, today we not only steam the ingredients but also pair it with a low carb ginger-scallion dipping sauce.

Low carb seafood dim sum from the Asian Paleo Cookbook by ChihYu Smith I Heart Umami

Is dim sum healthy?

Is dim sum healthy? Steamed dim sum is lower in carb and the savory filling has less sugar than sweet filling dumplings. Steamed dim sum is healthier than deep-fried counterparts. Dim sum can also mean vegetables for example bok choy dim sum, yu choy dim sum, and Chinese broccoli stir-fry with garlic sauce and these dim sums are lower in carbs and healthy.

My har gow crystal dumplings are gluten-free and paleo and dim sum-shumai is Paleo, Whole30, and Keto.

What Westernized Chinese food has the lowest carbs?

In general stir-fry or and steamed dishes that are high in fiber,  low in low starch, and little to no added sugar have the lowest carbs in Chinese food.

Be that as it may, the hidden carb from the sauce and the starch used to thicken the sauce can increase the carb counts. For people who prefer a low carb diet or eat Paleo and Keto, pay attention to the added sugar and starch quantity in the sauce.

The following modified takeout food has the lowest carbs:

  • Clear soup such as egg drop soup without or with very little starch thickener
  • Steamed food such as seafood platter or chicken broccoli without the dipping sauce
  • Vegetable stir-fries such as Moo shu chicken, shrimp, beef, or pork with little to no added sugar stir-fry sauce and without the crepes

What Chinese food can you eat on the Keto diet?

Asian Paleo Cookbook from I Heart Umami

Asian Paleo has 75 fresh, bold recipes inspired by my favorite dishes from China, Japan, Thailand, Vietnam, and beyond. The book includes easy weeknight meals, fun and festive weekend options, batch cooking for when there’s time to plan, and sides and sauces for any occasion and Each dish is free of gluten, wheat, soy, and added sugar.

The book is now available for purchase on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Target, Walmart, and Books-a-Million. And be sure to claim your Asian Paleo companion gift by visiting this page. Thanks so much!

ChihYu Smith Asian Paleo Cookbook from I Heart Umami

Low carb seafood dim sum from the Asian Paleo Cookbook by ChihYu Smith I Heart Umami
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Low Carb Seafood Dim Sum: Asian Paleo Cookbook | I Heart Umami

Prep Time: 5 mins
Cook Time: 20 mins
Total Time: 25 mins
Servings: 2 people
Author: ChihYu
Low carb seafood dim sum from the Asian Paleo Cookbook is super simple yet so incredibly delicious, you will be blown away! With only 3 ingredients in the seasoning, it takes only 5 minutes to assemble, making this Chinese fish and seafood recipe the ultimate low carb weeknight meal! 
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Ingredients

  • ¾ lb skinless, boneless sea bass or other meaty fish fillets, cut into 2.5-inch pieces
  • 6 pieces clams, scrubbed
  • 6 pieces shrimp
  • 1 to 2 full cap fresh shiitake mushrooms
  • 1 large carrot, sliced into coins
  • 5 to 6 spears asparagus, trimmed (woody bottoms discarded)
  • 3 tablespoons coconut aminos
  • 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil
  • Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Lemon wedges, optional
  • cup I Heart Umami Scallion-Ginger Dipping Oil, see notes section

Instructions

  • Place the fish, clams, shrimp, shiitake, and vegetables in a steamer basket lined with parchment paper or in a shallow, heatproof bowl so as to catch the juices. Season with the coconut aminos and sesame oil, and salt and pepper to taste.
  • Steam over medium to medium-low heat for 10 to 15 minutes. Remove from the pot and set aside the shrimp and asparagus. Steam the rest of the ingredients further until the fish is buttery and flaky and the clams are open.
  • Place the steamed ingredients in a serving bowl, straining the seafood juices through a sieve (save this stock for later use). Serve hot and immediately with lemon wedges, if using, and the dipping oil.

Notes

Reprinted from Asian Paleo by arrangement with The Countryman Press, a division of W.W. Norton & Company, Inc. Copyright © 2019, ChihYu Smith | I Heart Umami.
I Heart Umami Scallion-Ginger Dipping Oil (Makes about ⅔ cup)
  • ⅓ cup avocado oil
  • 5 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 1 medium shallot, minced
  • 1 tablespoon thinly sliced fresh ginger (matchsticks)
  • 4 scallions, chopped and separated into white and green parts
  • 1.5 teaspoons coarse salt, or to taste
  1. Heat the avocado oil in a small heavy-bottomed saucepan. Test the oil temperature by adding one slice of garlic: if it starts bubbling right away, that means the temperature is correct. If the garlic burns too quickly, that means the temperature is too hot and the heat should be lowered.
  2. Add the garlic, shallot, ginger, and white scallion parts to the oil. Cook until softened, stirring frequently to prevent them from burning. Season with salt to taste. You’ll want to aim on the slightly saltier side as this is a dipping sauce meant for plain boiled or steamed chicken, seafood (shrimp, white fish fillets), and/or vegetables (carrots, asparagus).
  3. Once the mixture has softened and you can smell a nice aroma, turn off the heat. Stir in the green scallion parts and remove from the heat to let cool.
  4. Serve the infused oil at room temperature. Store any extra in an airtight glass container in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks. Allow it to come to room temperature before using.
The nutritional label is calculated without the dipping sauce. You can serve the seafood dim sum with or without the dipping sauce. 

Nutrition

Serving: 1serving | Calories: 378kcal | Carbohydrates: 8g | Protein: 20g | Fat: 28g | Saturated Fat: 5g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 3g | Monounsaturated Fat: 3g | Cholesterol: 83mg | Sodium: 554mg | Potassium: 115mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 6355IU | Vitamin C: 2.1mg | Calcium: 12mg | Iron: 0.1mg
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Asian, Asian-inspired Paleo, Chinese
Keyword: Asian Paleo, Chinese Seafood Recipe, Low Carb Dim Sum, Low Carb Seafood Dim Sum, Paleo seafood recipes, Steamed Seafood Recipe
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