Paleo Beetroot Hummus with Dills and Pecans.

Have you heard of a sentence we eat with our eyes?

I have to say that I wasn’t quite convinced about the saying.  Until this dish – Paleo Beetroot Hummus with Dills and Pecans.

If you’ve met my family, you’d know that my folks back home are practical people, meaning nothing flashy, down to earth, and everything logical – well, at least, they think they are logical. 🙂   So when it comes to cooking, tasty and nutritious food has always been prized more highly than a dish that looks good but tastes boring.

So as an overachiever I, of course, cannot stand that I have to give up the goods for the taste.

I mean I want my man to have the looks and the smarts so we look good when we go out.   And it goes without saying that I want my food the same way + tasty + nutritious + environmentally friendly + sustainable.  What else??  Give me all babe !!

Do I have a type A personality?      Should I chill out a bit here?!      What was the topic today?

Oh yes, beets – the red beets.  How can you say no to that natural crimson/fuchsia color of lovely beets?

If you don’t like beets, sorry, we can’t be friends.

If you do, please stay on, I’ve found some goodies for you. 🙂

It turns out that a simple Google search reveals many nutritional benefits of eating beets.  Dr. Oz published a post saying that “beet juice is one of the richest dietary sources of antioxidants and naturally occurring nitrates.” He goes on to explain that “nitrates are compounds which improve blood flow throughout the body – including the brain, heart, and muscles. These natural nitrates increase a molecule in the blood vessels called nitric oxide, which helps open up the vessels and allows more oxygen flow as well as lower blood pressure.”  (source).

Even better is that beets are high in lipoic acid, one of the many antioxidants that are believed to help prevent our cells from damage caused by aging.  Ladies, antioxidants !! (source)

Men’s Health also says that beets are one of the best sources of both folate and betaine. “These two nutrients work together to lower our blood levels of homocysteine, an inflammatory compound that can damage our arteries and increase the risk of heart disease.”(Source)

A Few Words of Warning: Beets contain oxalates, which when consumed in excess can cause bodily fluids to crystallize. People with kidney or gallbladder problems should avoid over eating beets because they could exacerbate kidney and bladder stones. (source)

For more information about oxalates in fruits and vegetables, look here.

Whew that’s enough reading.   Let’s make something pretty first ! :))

Paleo Beetroot Hummus with Dills and Pecans
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
This recipe is slightly adapted from Kitchen Culinaire.
Author:
Recipe type: Snack
Cuisine: American ?
Serves: 4 servings
Ingredients
  • 3 small beets, about ½ lb
  • 2 tbsp tahini (Whole30 compliant)
  • 2 medium size garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • 1 lemon juice
  • ½ tsp dry chili flakes
  • 1-2 tbsp olive oil (optional)
Garnish:
  • 2 tbsp chopped fresh dill
  • ¼ cup coarsely chopped pecans
Instructions
To roast the beets:
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. Rinse the beets and wrap them individually in aluminum foil. Place them on a baking pan and bake for about 50-60 mins until the beets are easily pierced with a fork. Set aside to cool and use a peeler to peel the skin away.
  3. If you bake them in a larger batch, beets can be stored whole or sliced for up to a week in the refrigerator.
To make beetroot hummus:
  1. Slice the beets into smaller chunks and place them in a food processor with tahini, minced garlic, sea salt, lemon juice, and chili flakes. Process until smooth.
  2. (Optional) You can also add 1-2 tbsp of olive oil to thin the hummus paste if preferred.
  3. Serve with sliced vegetables such as bell peppers, carrots, and cucumbers, and garnish with chopped pecans and fresh dill.
  4. Enjoy the taste and the color!

Make these for dinner !

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